I am a bit struggling with this posting:

Google is your new homepage. Every page you have is a homepage for someone. We must think beyond the traditional homepage.

“The value of the homepage is decreasing,” a leaked New York Times report stated in May 2014. …

“As more and more traffic comes from search and social, the homepage as the entryway into a site’s content is increasingly obsolete,” Ann Friedman wrote for Columbia Journalism Review in 2013.

Control of the homepage often represents a pyrrhic victory for traditional marketers and communicators. I recently heard a communicator say that the homepage was one of the few places where they controlled the message. For this organization, only 10 percent of site visitors came to the homepage and for every 100 people who arrived at the homepage, only 3 clicked on a news link. Thus, controlling the homepage is only the illusion of controlling the message.

We don’t work on the homepage. We work on the network. The web is a network and those who work on the web are networkers. The link is the essence of the web. Web writing is link writing. Don’t think control, think sharing. How shareable is your content? Don’t think homepage. There’s no direction home on the web because home changes based on the context of what people want to do. …

Links are the currency of the web, not content, and links are an inherently collaborative and sharing activity. Nothing lives in isolation on the web. Every page is a homepage for someone.

via The Continued Decline of the Homepage.

I do agree, that the Home Page is not the most relevant page. BUT: I believe that the own web site is essential. It should be the place to drive people to. It is the place, you control the hopefully valuable content with Calls To Action (knowing that you can’t control the web and the net). Gerry McGovern’s posting could be interpreted in a way, that you don’t need your web site, your „owned content“: #TotalDisagree

And I do agree, that sharing and shareability is essential.

 

Veröffentlicht von Stefan Pfeiffer

Stefan Pfeiffer ist seit 2007 bei der IBM in verschiedenen Marketingpositionen tätig. Als gelernter Journalist hat er natürlich eine Leidenschaft für das Schreiben, die er hier im CIO Kurator, aber auch in seinem persönlichen Blog DigitalNaiv auslebt. Seine inhaltliche Leidenschaft im IT-Umfeld gilt dem digitalen Arbeitsplatz, dem Digital Workplace. Auf Twitter ist er als @DigitalNaiv „erreichbar“.

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